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CHILDREN OF DIVORCE
click title to view picture(s) of this feature!

PRESERVATION STATUS: Restored. Work needs to be done on "flash" titles. Located at Library of Congress(?) Note: Never Shown to the General Public!

Famous Players Lasky. Dist: Paramount Pictures April 2, 1927 (copyright: April 2, 1927; LP 23820). Silent b&w. 35mm. 7 reels, 6,662 or 6871 ft.

Presented by Adolph Zukor, Jesse L. Lasky. Directed by Frank Lloyd. Additional Director (see note): Josef von Sternberg. Screenplay: Hope Loring, Louis D. Lighton. Photographed by Victor Milner.

Cast: Clara Bow (Kitty Flanders), Ester Ralston (Jean Waddington), Gary Cooper (Ted Larrabee), Einar Hanson (Prince Ludovico de Sfax), Norman Trevor (Duke de Gondreville), Hedda Hopper(Katherine Flanders), Edward Martindel (Tom Larrabee), Julia Swayne Gordon (Princess de Sfax), tom Ricketts (The Secretary), Albert Gran (Mr. Seymour), Iris Stuart (Mousie), Margaret Campbell (Mother Superior), Percy Williams (Manning), Joyce Coad (Little Kitty), Yvonne Pelletier (Little Jean), Don Marion (Little Ted).

SOCIETY MELODRAMA: Source: Owen Johnson, "Children of Divorce" (Boston: 1927).

Jean Waddington, a childhood friend of Ted Larrabee, later falls in love with him. As he is, like her, the product of a broken home and the child of a dissolute and irresponsible father, Jean tells him he must prove himself before she will accept his marriage offer. Ted opens an office, but when their mutual friend, Kitty, gives a wild party in the building, he forgets business. Prince Ludovico de Sfax, in the charge of his guardian, the Duke de Gondreville, is attracted to Kitty, but the duke forbids his having an affair with her because of her poverty. One evening, on a drunken spree, Ted and Kitty get married, and, heartbroken, Jean goes to Europe. Later, Kitty and Ted arrive with their child and the prince's love is revived. Realizing that no bond of affection exists between her and Ted, Kitty takes poison, and Ted is reunited with Jean. *NOTE: Josef von Sternberg, at this time an assistant director at Paramount, is reputed to have directed some sequences of this film. (Information taken from "The American Film Institute Catalogue of Feature Films").


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